Get To Know Ballard!

Seattle has a lot of cool neighborhoods, and Ballard is right up there with the best of them. If you have time to explore, you should check out some of what Ballard is known for: Seafood, Beer and Scandinavian history!

The Junction Building in Ballard's Historic District. "Ballard Ave 11" by Joe Mabel. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ballard_Ave_11.jpg#/media/File:Ballard_Ave_11.jpg

The Junction Building in Ballard's Historic District. "Ballard Ave 11" by Joe Mabel. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ballard_Ave_11.jpg#/media/File:Ballard_Ave_11.jpg

Seafood: Ballard has lots of great seafood joints. Ever wonder why that is? Well, it may have something to do with the fact that Ballard has the largest fishing fleet on the West Coast. The wave of Scandinavian immigrants that immigrated in the late 19th and early 20th century were initially drawn to the region by Salmon Fishing.

But don’t believe us…

Try the blackened salmon sandwich or fish and chips at Ballard Brothers Seafood and Burgers. Or, if you’re looking for something more upscale, stop by Barnacle and get a few cocktails and fresh oysters.

Beer: Ballard has more breweries than any other neighborhood in Seattle. The first liquor license was issued in 1900, and at one time B-Town boasted more saloons per square feet of boardwalk than anywhere West of the Mississippi.

But don’t believe us…

Take your very own self guided “Beer Tour” of Ballard—make sure not to miss the rye beers at Reuben’s Brews or the insane selection of brews and medieval dining hall feel of the Ballard Beer Company.

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History: By now almost everyone knows about Ballard’s Scandinavian heritage. So maybe there’s not a lot I can tell you about that. But why not check out the Nordic Heritage Museum to learn more about some of Ballard’s history? Alternatively, a stroll along Seaview Avenue will take you past the Leif Erikson Memorial. Snag a picture with the imposing statue of this Norse explorer (especially at sunset, it looks cool).

"Seattle's Leif Erikson Statue" by Steven Pavlov. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seattle%27s_Leif_Erikson_statue.jpg

"Seattle's Leif Erikson Statue" by Steven Pavlov. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seattle%27s_Leif_Erikson_statue.jpg

Skipping over to downtown Ballard, Bergen Place Park (named after Ballard’s Sister City in Norway), features unique and eye-catching artwork (giant, whimsical trees) by Jenn Lee Dixon, titled “Witness Trees.” King Olaf of Norway dedicated the park in 1975.

"Ballard's Bergen Place Park" by Mahalie Stackpole. Licensed under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0).

"Ballard's Bergen Place Park" by Mahalie Stackpole. Licensed under Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0).

Want more Ballard? Join us this Saturday as we explore Ballard by night during our Know Your Neighborhood – Ballard event. Hope to see you there!

-Maggie Tarnawa, TWIF Blog Manager